This is for the Jason fans.

For those of you who have clicked our little “About the Indie Handbook” link and realized  it is indeed the same tiny, vague paragraph on our sidebar explaining a bit about who we are (cheap labor) and what we do (cheap labor, again), I have  news.  We will soon be posting something more.  Eric and I want you to understand more deeply what we’re all about here at the Indie Handbook–how such lovely, unassuming people could even deign to call ourselves something so pretentious as “The Indie Handbook,” as if we, more than you or your friends or Paste magazine, could be the Indie Authority.  So, just know that we’re working on it.

In the meantime, I’m going to put my indie cred at stake by reviewing a band closely associated with Jason Mraz.  I love Jason Mraz, but hearing “Geek in the Pink” on the radio station in my hometown beats into my brain that he is definitely not indie.  What many of you may not know is that Jason has a beautiful down-to-earth coffeeshop side, and you may consider checking out his album “Live at Java Joe’s” and some of the various recordings you can dig for online rather than basing your opinion of him on “Wordplay.”  Here is an example of one of his lesser-known, unavailable on iTunes tunes.

My real reason for writing today, however, isn’t to talk about Jason, no matter how much I adore him. If you were fortunate enough to go to Jason Mraz’s “Music, Magic, and Makepeace” tour last spring, you may have heard of the Makepeace Brothers. Finian, Ciaran, Aidan, and Liam Makepeace + Conor Gaffney = the Makepeace Brothers. Their influences include a lot of big names in American music, including Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen, and their music really does have a uniquely American feel. Their harmonies are simple and lovely, and their lyrics adorably hopeful. While this may put off some more flamboyant indie lovers, fans of Jaymay, Brett Dennen, or Ben Kweller will adore the Makepeace Brothers’ soulful, laid-back indie-folk. Check out their myspace here…I particularly recommend “Lonely Days” and “I Can Always Do It.”

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