Yes, I did hear her first.  I heard her before Starbucks put her on one of their mixes.  Reasons I am reviewing her now:

1) Dutch week starts in 45 minutes (eastern time), that is if Eric is still going for it, and she is not Dutch, soooo…
2) If I don’t hurry up, they will not only be playing her in Starbucks, but they will also be playing her in Gap (I heard “Asleep on a Sunbeam” by Belle & Sebastian in there a couple of months ago, p.s.), and then she will lose her indie cred completely.  But I like her.  So there.

When asked what he would choose to eat if he could pick his last meal, famous chef, food writer, and world traveler Anthony Bourdain said that he would want comfort food…maybe meatballs.  And comfort food is what Jaymay is to the indie/folk music scene.  While lacking the depth of musical theory knowledge, elaborate instrumental combinations, and massive numbers about which bands like the Polyphonic Spree and Pink Martini can boast, Jaymay gives musically and lyrically pure, laid-back, melancholic, driving-in-the-rain perfection.

Although she’s originally from New York, Autumn Fallin’, Jaymay’s first complete album, came out in November 2007 in London on the Heavenly/EMI label.  “Sea Green, See Blue” has been featured in the embarrassingly pathetic CBS television show “How I Met Your Mother” and on a recent Starbucks mix.  Oh, how ironic that Starbucks would be indie…

Back on track, Autumn Fallin’ provides a unique mix of jazz, folk, and acoustic influences.  “Hard to Say” has the most notable jazz influence with its swing rhythms and dominant chords–if only Jaymay wouldn’t save her improvised mouth trumpet scat for one track!  While not one of her songs isn’t absolutely beautiful–light and moving, with simple chord structures–her storytelling sets her apart.  Through each track’s narrative, she wears her heart on her sleeve, begging for personal connection.  And she gets that connection, as love for a friend (“Gray or Blue”), the impossibility of reconciling some situations (“Ill Willed Person”), and transitions and regrets (“Sea Green, See Blue”) are all situations not unfamiliar to us.  Not to mention that Jaymay has a sparkling and seductive voice, less bizarre than Jenny Lewis’ and less boring than Norah Jones’.

We’re all praying that this precious coffeehouse brunette can avoid selling out to Starbucks or crappy CBS television shows, but she seems to have enough Punky Brewster spunk to stick it out in the indie/folk scene.  Save Autumn Fallin’ for one of those days when you’re dying for some lovely introspectiveness.

she is so cute.

[happy Easter, by the way.]

Advertisements